Easter Egg hunt

The chocolate Easter Egg is a symbol of our rampant consumerism – and ignorance of where true life and satisfaction are found.

According to the Daily Mail only one in ten chocolate eggs will carry the word ‘Easter’ on the front of its packaging this year. For example, Cadbury’s ‘Easter Egg Trail Pack’ has been rebranded ‘Egg Hunt Pack’.

Apparently, the egg is an ancient symbol of new life and, for some Christians, is said to represent Jesus’ emergence from the tomb and resurrection (which is at least a simpler thing to explain than the rather bizarre mythology of the Easter bunny – a furry version of Santa Claus bringing coloured eggs and toys to children in a basket).

At its simplest level, the removal of the label ‘Easter’ from is a marker of the decline in loyalty to the Christian faith in this country. Manufacturers might be over-reacting, but there will be some who might be offended by the Christian connection although most will not be bothered either way. So, to maximise the worship of the god of sweetness, just remove the religious tag and increase the sale of chocolate eggs. 

But let’s be honest, the link between Easter Eggs and the story of the resurrection has always been tenuous. Most children (and unreconstructed processed-sugar consumers of all ages) are much more interested in the chocolate than the symbolism.

Ironically, the Easter Egg is more suitable as a symbol of our consumer culture; the elaborate and brightly-coloured packaging mirrors the way we fill up our lives with so much that looks good – but is ultimately worthless and often damaging. The fleeting pleasure of the sugar rush stands for the way we demand instant gratification in our reach for satisfaction and meaning – but all we actually achieve is an insatiable desire for more.

In the end we don’t need more Easter branding. We want more Easter life and more Easter hope. Only Jesus can give us a satisfying and substantial life; he offers life that is more than just cardboard filler – life to the full, not just a fleeting moment of pleasure. It is a forgiven life, paid for by his death and an eternal life guaranteed by his resurrection.

Graham Nicholls, Director of Affinity


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